Civil War Wiki
Advertisement

This is a List of Confederate monuments. These are monuments or memorials dedicated to the memory of those who served and died in service to the Confederate States of America during the American Civil War.

Many Confederate monuments were erected in the former Confederate states and border states in the decades following the Civil War, in many instances by the United Daughters of the Confederacy and other memorial organizations.[1][2][3][4][5] Other Confederate monuments are located on Civil War battlefields.[1]

New Confederate monuments continue to be proposed, and some have been built in recent years. In Arizona, a Sons of Confederate Veterans unit erected a Confederate monument in Phoenix in 1999[6] and Confederate heritage groups dedicated a Confederate memorial in Sierra Vista in 2010.[7] The Delaware Confederate Monument was unveiled in 2007 in Georgetown, Delaware.[8] In South Carolina in 2010, the Sons of Confederate Veterans have sought to erect a monument to mark the 150th anniversary of the passage of the Ordinance of Secession in December 1860, but the cities of Charleston and North Charleston have refused them permission.[9][10]

Many Confederate monuments are listed on the National Register of Historic Places.[11]

Confederate monuments are listed here alphabetically by state, and by city within each state:

Alabama[]

  • Alabama Confederate Monument, also known as the "Monument to Confederate Soldiers and Sailors", on the grounds of the Alabama State Capitol, Montgomery, Alabama. [12] Former CSA President Jefferson Davis laid the cornerstone in 1886, but it was not completed until 1898. Funding for the monument included $20,000 in the form of two grants from the state legislature, $10,000 contributed by the Ladies Memorial Association of Alabama, $6,755 from the Historical and Monumental Association of Alabama that was formed in 1865 to support the erection of this monument, and $5,000 from politicians.[13]

Arizona[]

  • Arizona Confederate Veterans Monument in Greenwood Memory Lawn Cemetery in Phoenix, erected in 1999 by the Sons of Confederate Veterans[6]
  • Arizona Confederate Veterans Monument in Wesley Bolen Park, next to the Arizona State Capitol in Phoenix, erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy[6]
  • Confederate Memorial in the Historical Soldiers Memorial Cemetery area of the Southern Arizona Veterans’ Cemetery in Sierra Vista. The monument was erected in 2010 to honor soldiers interred in that cemetery who served in the Confederate Army during the Civil War and later fought in Indian wars in Arizona as members of the U.S. Army.[7]

Arkansas[]

  • Arkadelphia Confederate Monument, Arkadelphia, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Clark County, Arkansas
  • Batesville Confederate Monument, Batesville, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Independence County, Arkansas
  • Bentonville Confederate Monument, Bentonville, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Benton County, Arkansas
  • Camden Confederate Monument, Camden, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Ouachita County, Arkansas
  • Clarksville Confederate Monument, Clarksville, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Johnson County, Arkansas
  • Conway Confederate Monument, Conway, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Faulkner County, Arkansas
  • Dardanelle Confederate Monument, Dardanelle, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Yell County, Arkansas
  • El Dorado Confederate Monument, El Dorado, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Union County, Arkansas
  • Ft. Smith Confederate Monument, Ft. Smith, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Sebastian County, Arkansas
  • Hot Springs Confederate Monument, Hot Springs, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Garland County, Arkansas
  • Lake Village Confederate Monument, Lake Village, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Chicot County, Arkansas
  • Monument to Confederate Women (or "Mother of the South"), Arkansas State Capitol grounds, Little Rock, Arkansas. Unviled in 1913. Statue depicts a mother and daughter saying good-bye to their 16-year-old son and brother who is leaving to join his father in the fighting.[14]
  • Lonoke Confederate Monument, Lonoke, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Lonoke County, Arkansas
  • Monticello Confederate Monument, Monticello, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Drew County, Arkansas
  • Jackson Guards Memorial, Newport, Arkansas, built in 1914. Monument consists of a statue of a single Confederate soldier and a roster of the men who served in the Jackson Guards and the slaves who supported them. The only Confederate monument in Arkansas built entirely with funds raised by private subscription.[14]
  • Pine Bluff Confederate Monument, Pine Bluff, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Jefferson County, Arkansas
  • Searcy Confederate Monument, Searcy, Arkansas. Erected in 1917 on the grounds of the White County courhouse. Listed on the National Register of Historic Places in White County, Arkansas. Consists of a statue of a Confederate soldier.[14]
  • Van Buren Confederate Monument, Van Buren, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Crawford County, Arkansas
  • Washington Confederate Monument, Washington, Arkansas, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Hempstead County, Arkansas

Delaware[]

  • Delaware Confederate Monument, Georgetown, Delaware, unveiled in 2007 [8]

Georgia[]

  • Confederate monument in downtown Augusta, Georgia[15]
  • Confederate Monument, Forsyth Park, Savannah, Georgia; completed in 1879[3]

Kentucky[]

Template:Seealso

Mississippi[]

  • Rankin County Confederate Monument, Brandon, Mississippi, listed on the NRHP in Rankin County, Mississippi
  • Jones County Courthouse and Confederate Monument at Ellisville, Ellisville, Mississippi, listed on the NRHP in Jones County, Mississippi
  • Confederate Memorial, Hattiesburg, Mississippi; erected by the United Daughters of the Confederacy in 1910[16]
  • Attala County Courthouse and Confederate Monument, Kosciusko, Mississippi, listed on the NRHP in Attala County, Mississippi
  • Clarke County Courthouse and Confederate Monument, Quitman, Mississippi, listed on the NRHP in Clarke County, Mississippi

Missouri[]

North Carolina[]

Pennsylvania[]

  • Gettysburg Battlefield is the site of several Confederate monuments erected between 1884 and 1982 to honor the dead of specific units or states[18]

Tennessee[]

  • Confederate Monument, Union City, Tennessee, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Obion County, Tennessee

Texas[]

  • Confederate Soldiers Monument, Texas State Capitol, Austin, Texas; erected beginning 1903 [19]
  • Confederate War Memorial, Dallas, Texas. Originally erected in City Park in 1897, but relocated to Pioneer Park Cemetery in 1961 due to highway construction.[20]

Virginia[]

  • Confederate Memorial or Confederate Monument in Arlington National Cemetery in Arlington, Virginia; authorized in 1906 by Secretary of War William Howard Taft and unveiled in 1914[21]
  • Confederate Monument, in Portsmouth, Virginia, listed on the National Register of Historic Places in Portsmouth, Virginia
  • Pyramidal mausoleum in Hollywood Cemetery, Richmond, Virginia

West Virginia[]

See also[]

References[]

  1. 1.0 1.1 Civil War Monuments, Tennessee Encyclopedia of History and Culture
  2. David N. Wiggins (2006), Georgia's Confederate Monuments and Cemeteries, Arcadia Press.
  3. 3.0 3.1 Confederate Monument in Forsyth Park, City of Savannah website, accessed April 24, 2010
  4. United Daughters of the Confederacy Alabama Division (ALUDC), Encyclopedia of Alabama
  5. Ladies' Memorial Associations and The Lost Cause, Encyclopedia of Virginia
  6. 6.0 6.1 6.2 Gravemarking and Monuments, Colonel Sherod Hunter Camp 1525, Sons of Confederate Veterans, accessed April 26, 2010
  7. 7.0 7.1 Confederate Memorial dedicated, Sierra Vista Herald, April 17, 2010
  8. 8.0 8.1 "Hurrah! The Delaware Confederate Monument Has a Home at Last!". Sons of Confederate Veterans Camp #2608 website. http://www.descv.org/CS.html. Retrieved April 24, 2010. 
  9. http://www.heraldonline.com/2010/04/14/2088405/n-charleston-leaders-want-confederate.html
  10. http://www.southcarolinaradionetwork.com/2010/04/22/scv-secession-monument-at-no-chas-park-was-mayors-idea/
  11. "National Register Information System". National Register of Historic Places. National Park Service. 2009-03-13. http://www.nr.nps.gov/. 
  12. Alabama Confederate Monument, Conservation Solutions Inc., accessed April 24, 2010
  13. Ladies Memorial Association, Encyclopedia of Alabama
  14. 14.0 14.1 14.2 National Register of Historic Places Multiple Property Registration Form: Civil War Commemorative Sculpture in Arkansas, 1886-1934, 1996.
  15. Downtown Confederate monument defaced with anti-white messages, The Augusta Chronicle, November 8, 2009
  16. Erica Sherrill Owens, Group celebrates Confederate Memorial Day, Hattiesburg American, April 24, 2010
  17. Downtown Salisbury Street Scenes - Confederate Monument, Rowan County, North Carolina, government website, accessed April 24, 2010
  18. Confederate Monuments at Gettysburg, StoneSentinels.com website, accessed April 24, 2010
  19. Monument Guide: Confederate Soldiers, State Preservation Board Caretakers of the Texas Capitol website, accessed April 24, 2010
  20. Confederate Monument, DallasHistory.net website, accessed April 26, 2010
  21. Visitor Information: Monuments and Memorials: Confederate Memorial, Arlington National Cemetery website, accessed April 24, 2010
Advertisement